Parliaments Politics and People seminar: Rhodri Morgan, ‘Wales and the United Kingdom Question’

Reporting back from our last ‘Parliaments, politics and people‘ seminar… A more modern focus at our last seminar of the term when we heard from Rhodri Morgan; MP for Cardiff West from 1987-2001, shadow minister for Labour from 1988-1997 and finally First Minister for Wales from 2000 to 2009. He spoke candidly about his experiences in Westminster, in Cardiff, and within the Labour party from … Continue reading Parliaments Politics and People seminar: Rhodri Morgan, ‘Wales and the United Kingdom Question’

2013 History of Parliament Schools Competitions

On the anniversary of the death of the Oxford martyrs, a timely note about our schools competition this year and our upcoming new schools section, which will initially feature materials on the Reformation… For the ninth year running, the History of Parliament is launching its schools competitions for 11-14 and 16-18 year olds. For the 11-14 year olds, this year’s competition will focus on the … Continue reading 2013 History of Parliament Schools Competitions

17th Century Papal elections: Charles II’s unorthodox role

After this week’s excitement from the Vatican, Dr Robin Eagles shares a story of 17th Century papal elections that the Stuarts really were not supposed to have been involved in… Charles II has frequently been suspected of Catholic sympathies. It was a topic of general concern throughout his reign and of the five rival members of the “CABAL ministry”, three had some Catholic associations. Thomas … Continue reading 17th Century Papal elections: Charles II’s unorthodox role

Col. Josiah Wedgwood’s Questionnaires (3) – using the results

In the final of her blogs inspired by her recent book, ‘Colonel Josiah Wedgwood’s Questionnaire: Members of Parliament 1885-1918’, Priscilla Baines takes a look at how Wedgwood used his questionnaires… Wedgwood had a high response to his questionnaire, although the subjects were not always enthusiastic about completion! In a far more reticent age, the questions were seen as too personal and intrusive and many were … Continue reading Col. Josiah Wedgwood’s Questionnaires (3) – using the results

Originally posted on The Victorian Commons:
The recent scandal about beef and other ready meals containing horsemeat has shown how food can quickly become a hot political topic, with consumers and the media putting pressure on retailers and politicians for action. Following the publication of its report on 14 February, the Select Committee  on the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs has continued to hear evidence… Continue reading

Parliaments Politics and People seminar: Andrew Thompson (Queens’ Cambridge) ‘George II, Power and Parliament’

Dr Robin Eagles reports back from our latest ‘Parliament, politics and people‘ seminar… Neither of the first two Hanoverian monarchs has fared well in popular perception. Both have been dismissed as remote, stolid and very foreign. Our latest seminar by Andrew Thompson challenged some of these preconceptions about the second of the Georges. In his paper Andrew sought to draw together some of his earlier … Continue reading Parliaments Politics and People seminar: Andrew Thompson (Queens’ Cambridge) ‘George II, Power and Parliament’

The Welsh and the English…

Another, short, blog for St David’s day (you would never guess where I’m from!) and our celebration of all things Welsh in preparation of Rhodri Morgan’s upcoming talk to our ‘Parliaments, Politics and People’ seminar. This time an extract from a 17th century source warning against upsetting the Welsh… The following extract is from the diary of William Schellinks, a Dutch artist who visited England … Continue reading The Welsh and the English…