The Peace of Utrecht, April 1713

300 years ago this April, a series of treaties known as the Peace of Utrecht was signed to end the War of Spanish Succession (1702-13). Dr Charles Littleton tells us more… The War of Spanish succession began after the Spanish King Carlos II bequeathed Spain and its empire to the grandson of Louis XIV of France, a concentration of power in the French King that … Continue reading The Peace of Utrecht, April 1713

Writing the History of Parliament in Early Modern England – colloquium report

Dr Paul Cavill, lecturer in early modern history at the University of Leeds, reports back from last weekend’s colloquium ‘Writing the History of Parliament in Early Modern England’… The History of Parliament Trust and the Centre for Early Modern British and Irish History at Oxford University joined forces last Saturday to host a colloquium at Jesus College. The title was ‘Writing the History of Parliament … Continue reading Writing the History of Parliament in Early Modern England – colloquium report

The Treaty of Paris, John Wilkes and North Briton Number 45

On 23 April 1763, John Wilkes published his famous ‘North Briton No.45’, attacking George III and his Prime Minister, the Earl of Bute. Dr Robin Eagles tells us more… George III came to the throne in 1760 determined to bring to fruition plans for a fundamental change in the political balance of power within Britain. Emulating the programme of his father’s opposition court based at … Continue reading The Treaty of Paris, John Wilkes and North Briton Number 45

Forcing Parliament…

360 years ago today, Oliver Cromwell dissolved the Rump Parliament, with a little help from a company of musketeers. Here’s a look at some occasions when force was used against Parliament … By 1653, tensions were high between Oliver Cromwell and the Rump Parliament. The Rump came into being after Pride’s Purge in 1648 primarily to ensure the trial and execution of Charles I. Yet … Continue reading Forcing Parliament…

Col. Thomas Rainborowe: ‘The poorest he that is in England hath a right to live as the greatest he’

Today’s In Our Time programme on Radio Four focuses on the Putney Debates 0f 1647. Dr Stephen Roberts sheds more light on one of the key figures, Col. Thomas Rainborowe (also Rainborough or Rainsborough)… Surely the most enduring words to have been spoken at the Putney Debates (28-29 Oct. 1647) between the junior and senior officers of the new model army were those of Col. … Continue reading Col. Thomas Rainborowe: ‘The poorest he that is in England hath a right to live as the greatest he’

Prime Ministers’ Funerals

A look back at the different Prime Ministers who received public funerals… Tomorrow former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher’s funeral will take place at St Paul’s Cathedral. Public funerals for Prime Ministers have been fairly rare in recent years, but Baroness Thatcher is by no means alone in receiving this honour from the state. The first Prime Minister to have a public funeral was William Pitt … Continue reading Prime Ministers’ Funerals

Oral History: Memories from MPs in their own words

Today we’re delighted to launch a new section of our website dedicated to our oral history project. In this section you’ll find pages dedicated to eighteen of our first interviewees, containing wonderful portraits by the photographer Michael Waller-Bridge, brief biographies, full interview summaries and extracts from the interviews themselves. Our Oral History project has been up and running since the November 2011 and aims to … Continue reading Oral History: Memories from MPs in their own words