David Magliocco, ‘Popularity, “popularity” and popularity: Pepys and popularity’

Dr Robin Eagles reports back from our latest ‘Parliaments, Politics and People’ seminar… The last Parliaments seminar returned to the middle years of the 17th century when David Magliocco, armed with an intriguing title, sought to delve into Samuel Pepys’ assessment of the period by examining the multi-faceted term ‘popularity’. The main thrust of his paper centred on the pivotal years 1666-7, which saw the … Continue reading David Magliocco, ‘Popularity, “popularity” and popularity: Pepys and popularity’

Sir Isaac Wake and the case for war

With the crisis in Syria deepening, this week the Foreign Secretary and Speaker of the Commons have both promised that MPs will have their say before the UK arms anyone in the conflict, yet the Prime Minister has insisted the Government will reserve the right to act without a Commons vote. Dr Vivienne Larminie tells us how the Government in the early 17th Century was … Continue reading Sir Isaac Wake and the case for war

The History of Parliament lecture: Dr Amanda Foreman

The History of Parliament has held an annual lecture in Westminster for eight years, until last year Dr Amanda Foreman, author of ‘Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire’ and ‘A World on Fire’ was unfortunately delayed thanks to Hurricane Sandy. Not to be deterred, Dr Foreman made it over to Westminster at the beginning of June to give her long-anticipated lecture: ‘How to make friends and corrupt … Continue reading The History of Parliament lecture: Dr Amanda Foreman

Emily Wilding Davison and women in Parliament

Last week saw the centenary of the death of the suffragette Emily Wilding Davison (1872-1913), who died from her injuries four days after being knocked unconscious by the King’s horse at the Epsom Derby. The Victorian Commons’ Dr. Kathryn Rix went to one of the events held in Parliament last week to mark this anniversary. She writes here about some of the online resources available … Continue reading Emily Wilding Davison and women in Parliament

Parliaments, Politics and People seminar: Nigel Aston ‘Out of retirement: Lord Lansdowne and opposition politics in the 1790s’

At our last ‘parliaments, politics and people’ seminar, Dr Nigel Aston (University of Leicester) spoke on William Petty, Lord Lansdowne and his role as an opposition politician in the 1790s. He surveyed Lansdowne’s years after his term as Prime Minister (1782-3), which are often glossed over in accounts of his life. Instead of disappearing into the shadows, Dr Aston argued, during these years Lansdowne was … Continue reading Parliaments, Politics and People seminar: Nigel Aston ‘Out of retirement: Lord Lansdowne and opposition politics in the 1790s’

‘The Long Parliament and State Formation’ colloquium report

Last month, our Commons, 1640-1660 section hosted a colloquium to discuss their research to date and to prepare for work on their survey volume. Dr Vivienne Larminie reports back… The outbreak of civil war in August 1642 landed Parliament in an unprecedented situation. Besides having to raise money and men to fight, for the first time it had to act as both legislature and executive.  … Continue reading ‘The Long Parliament and State Formation’ colloquium report

Charting the changing culture of modern elections

A guest post today from Dr David Thackeray (Exeter University) on the changing culture of elections. David recently organised the exhibition ‘Democracy in Devon‘  at the Devon Heritage Centre (which you can still catch for a few weeks), and has also blogged for The Victorian Commons. Charting the changing culture of modern elections, David Thackeray How has the culture of modern elections changed with the … Continue reading Charting the changing culture of modern elections