Impeachments and the British Parliament

Every year, the History of Parliament holds two competitions for schools and one for university students, for the best undergraduate dissertation to focus on Parliamentary or political history. We recently gave last year’s winner, Gary Hutchison, his prize for his dissertation ‘No Party Matter either in or out of doors: reaction to the Impeachment of Henry Dundas, First Viscount Melville’. Here, Gary, who has completed his … Continue reading Impeachments and the British Parliament

The ‘warming-pan baby’: James Edward Francis Stuart

During this week’s excitement over the birth of Prince George of Cambridge, a number of commentators have discussed the ‘warming-pan baby’ – James Edward Francis Stuart. It was his birth, in 1688, that led to the now abandoned tradition of Home Secretaries being present at a royal birth. Here, Dr Charles Littleton explains the circumstances and dramatic political consequences of that royal birth… While the … Continue reading The ‘warming-pan baby’: James Edward Francis Stuart

The ‘transformation’ of representation, 1386-1558

Last month, Dr Simon Payling spoke at the final ‘Parliaments, politics and people’ seminar on the ‘Transformation of the Commons, 1386-1588’. Here is Simon’s summary of his paper… The paper described the changing composition of the Commons between the majority of Richard II and the death of Mary I, a significant period in its evolution. The most apparent change was the reversal of an earlier … Continue reading The ‘transformation’ of representation, 1386-1558

HLF funding for a new History of Parliament oral history project!

The History of Parliament Trust is delighted to announce that we have been awarded Heritage Lottery Funding for a new oral history project. This project: ‘From the Grassroots: An Oral History of Community Politics in Devon’ will focus on political activism in Devon. It will be based at the Devon Heritage Centre, and also has the support of the Houses of Parliament’s Public Engagement and … Continue reading HLF funding for a new History of Parliament oral history project!

Marriage in the English Revolution

As same-sex marriage legislation receives royal consent today, Dr Stephen Roberts, the editor of our Commons 1640-1660 section, looks back at debates over marriage laws during the 17th Century… ‘Marriage is best left to the churches, not politicians.’ The view of newspaper columnist Trevor Kavanagh (BBC Radio 4, Any Questions, 24 May 2013) was expressed at a time when forms of marriage are in contention. … Continue reading Marriage in the English Revolution

In honour of Professor John Morrill

Last month, a collection of essays was published in honour of the leading early modern historian, Professor John Morrill: ‘The Nature of the English Revolution Revisited.’ Amongst many other things, Professor Morrill is the chair of the HoP’s editorial board. Our director, Dr Paul Seaward, and one of the contributors to the volume, Philip Baker, take a look at Professor Morrill’s contribution to both the … Continue reading In honour of Professor John Morrill

Tennis fever at the Restoration Court

As normal during Wimbledon, the country has been tennis mad for the past ten days, and with Murray in today’s semi-finals this will only get worse! Dr Stuart Handley takes a look back at another time when tennis fever hit: at the Court of Charles II… As all eyes are on SW19, one should perhaps reflect upon the popularity of the game of tennis among … Continue reading Tennis fever at the Restoration Court