Writing Parliamentary Biography, the Commons 1640-1660. Part 3: John Pym (1584-1643) the ubiquitous but invisible MP

In the third of a four-part series, Dr Stephen Roberts, editor of the Commons 1640-60 section, discusses writing the biography of a ‘workaholic’ political leader… In the last blog, I discussed Sir Simonds D’Ewes, whose compulsive autobiographical instinct has left us with a feast of materials about his own life and opinions, but who poses a challenge to the biographer wanting to move beyond D’Ewes’s … Continue reading Writing Parliamentary Biography, the Commons 1640-1660. Part 3: John Pym (1584-1643) the ubiquitous but invisible MP

MPs in World War I: Michael Hugh Hicks-Beach, Viscount Quenington (1877-1916)

Michael Hugh Hicks-Beach had served as Tewkesbury’s Conservative MP for just over a decade when he was killed in action in Egypt on 23 April 1916. He shared his first name with his father, Michael Edward Hicks-Beach (first Earl St Aldwyn), who had a distinguished political career, holding several ministerial positions. Most notably, he was Chancellor of the Exchequer in Lord Salisbury’s 1885-6 and 1895-1902 … Continue reading MPs in World War I: Michael Hugh Hicks-Beach, Viscount Quenington (1877-1916)

‘Speaking in Parliament: History, politics, rhetoric’ conference report

Last week, in collaboration with Professor Christopher Reid (Queen Mary, University of London, author of ‘Imprison’d Wranglers: the Rhetorical Culture of the House of Commons’) we hosted a conference dedicated to the art and history of parliamentary rhetoric. Academics with backgrounds in history, English, drama and politics came together from across the world for this two-day meeting, wonderfully organised by the team at Queen Mary. … Continue reading ‘Speaking in Parliament: History, politics, rhetoric’ conference report

Parliament, Politics and People Seminar: Jason Frost, ‘Church, State and Parliament in the Late Eighteenth Century in the Martyrdom Day Sermons of 30th January’

Reporting back from our latest ‘Parliaments, Politics and People’ Seminar, Jason Frost (University of Westminster) spoke on ‘Church, State and Parliament in the Late Eighteenth Century in the Martyrdom Day Sermons of 30th January.’ Here he discusses his paper… “…That every thirtieth day of January…shall be forever hereafter set apart to be kept and observed in all the Churches and Chapels of these Your Majesty’s … Continue reading Parliament, Politics and People Seminar: Jason Frost, ‘Church, State and Parliament in the Late Eighteenth Century in the Martyrdom Day Sermons of 30th January’