Parliament, the French church and ‘illegal’ worship

Following the recent publication of her edited volume ‘Huguenot Networks’, Dr Vivienne Larminie, Senior Research Fellow in the Commons 1640-60 Section, discusses how the Huguenot French church in Westminster offered MPs and peers an opportunity to breach their own legislation during the civil wars and interregnum… Following the Reformation, the government, discipline, doctrine and worship of the Church of England were defined by parliamentary legislation.  … Continue reading Parliament, the French church and ‘illegal’ worship

Naoroji: the life of the first Indian MP

Last month we were delighted to celebrate the life and work of Dr Dadabhai Naoroji at an event in Portcullis House, Westminster, in collaboration with the Zoroastrian All Party Parliamentary Group and the Zoroastrian Trust Funds of Europe (ZFTE). 2017 is the centenary of the death of Naoroji, who we remember as the first Indian to be elected to Parliament. But Naoroji’s achievements were much … Continue reading Naoroji: the life of the first Indian MP

Reporting Parliament: Hansard, Throwback Thursday

Today in our ‘Reporting Parliament’ series for Parliament Week, we have a guestblog from the team at Hansard. Here they have recorded the ‘day in the life’ of a Hansard reporter, now and thirty years ago… 2017: Thursday, 9 am I’m on the bus to work, flicking between cat memes and the Hansard website on my iPhone to read last night’s work. I scan today’s … Continue reading Reporting Parliament: Hansard, Throwback Thursday

Acquitted with three huzzas: the impeachment of Robert Harley, earl of Oxford

In today’s ‘Reporting Parliament’ series for Parliament Week 2017, Dr Robin Eagles considers the value of manuscript news accounts of the impeachment of the earl of Oxford just over 300 years ago for providing a more detailed impression of the proceedings. On 1 July 1717 Robert Harley, earl of Oxford, was acquitted of high treason. It was a process that had begun two years previously … Continue reading Acquitted with three huzzas: the impeachment of Robert Harley, earl of Oxford

‘His life was lovely and pleasant & he died in glory’: the Hon. Neil James Archibald Primrose (1882-1917)

Continuing our series on MPs who died while serving in the First World War, Dr. Kathryn Rix looks at the life of a former prime minister’s son. One of the first MPs to die while fighting in the First World War, William Glynne Charles Gladstone, was the grandson of a former Liberal prime minister. On 15 November 1917 the son of another former Liberal prime … Continue reading ‘His life was lovely and pleasant & he died in glory’: the Hon. Neil James Archibald Primrose (1882-1917)

Reporting Parliament: Invasion scare in Sandwich?

In today’s ‘Reporting Parliament’ series for Parliament Week 2017, Dr Vivienne Larminie, Senior Research Fellow in the Commons 1640-60 Section, discusses the problem of ‘fake news’ during the Civil Wars… The concern of Parliament with the destabilising potential of false news was of long standing, but the advent of civil war in the 1640s provided special reasons to be vigilant against the dissemination of erroneous, … Continue reading Reporting Parliament: Invasion scare in Sandwich?

Reporting Parliament – In the Later Middle Ages

Today’s post is the first in our special series of blogs for this year’s Parliament Week: Reporting Parliament throughout the ages. Dr Hannes Kleineke, Senior Research Fellow in our Commons 1422-1504 project, describes how medieval constituents kept up to date with parliamentary business… The evidence for the medieval English parliament, more limited than for other periods of its existence, can give it a somewhat unreal … Continue reading Reporting Parliament – In the Later Middle Ages