Currant affairs? Taxation without representation in early Stuart England

With tariffs on imported goods currently in the news, Dr. Simon Healy of the Lords 1604-29 Section provides some food for thought on Parliament and customs duties in the seventeenth century… Dried grapes were a luxury product in medieval England, but in the sixteenth century they became more readily available. By 1600 around 1,000 tons of dried fruit were imported annually. What does this have … Continue reading Currant affairs? Taxation without representation in early Stuart England

Irish MPs and the Crimean War 1853-1856

This week at the History of Parliament we are sharing the military history of Parliament through parliamentarians and their military careers in honour of Armed Forces Day this weekend (30 June). Today’s blog from Dr Stephen Ball of the Commons 1832-1868 Section outlines the contributions of former and serving nineteenth century MPs in the Crimean War… The Crimean War, which was fought between Russia and Britain … Continue reading Irish MPs and the Crimean War 1853-1856

A Fighting Life: Commemorating Josiah C. Wedgwood, founder of the History of Parliament project

Today we hear from our Public Engagement Officer, Sammy Sturgess about our recent event in Westminster to launch our activities to commemorate the life of the founder of the History of Parliament project and lifelong crusader for democracy, Col. Josiah C. Wedgwood MP…  On 12 June in Parliament, amid the Commons voting on the Lords’ amendments to the Brexit bill, the History of Parliament Trust … Continue reading A Fighting Life: Commemorating Josiah C. Wedgwood, founder of the History of Parliament project

The General Election of 1818

Today’s blog from Editor of the Commons 1832-1868 Section, Dr Philip Salmon details the significance of the contentious and rather lengthy 1818 election, and the way it shaped constituency voting in the lead up to the Great Reform Act, 1832… This month marks the 200th anniversary of the 1818 general election, the first of a series of elections held after the Napoleonic wars that began … Continue reading The General Election of 1818

Gout and the political career of Lord Broghill

Today’s blog from Dr Patrick Little of the Commons 1640-1660 Section sees the return of our focus on health, medicine and Parliament. Patrick discusses the detrimental effect of gout on the career of Lord Broghill in the mid-seventeenth century… Roger Boyle, Lord Broghill, is perhaps best known as the leading supporter of the scheme to make Oliver Cromwell king under the revised constitution, the Humble … Continue reading Gout and the political career of Lord Broghill

Parliaments, Politics and People seminar – St Stephen’s Cloisters: Politics, Patronage and Space

Ahead of our final Parliaments, Politics and People seminar of the term this evening at the IHR, here’s the blog from our previous session from Elizabeth Biggs of the University of York and Liz Hallam Smith of the University of York and the Houses of Parliament. Their paper discussed the changing identity and uses of St Stephen’s Cloisters… Space within the Houses of Parliament has … Continue reading Parliaments, Politics and People seminar – St Stephen’s Cloisters: Politics, Patronage and Space

“More the air of an assassin than of a gentleman”: Duels & attempted murder in eighteenth-century England

The recent BBC adaptation of John Preston’s book – A Very English Scandal – about the trial of the former Liberal leader Jeremy Thorpe for conspiracy and incitement to murder, prompted us at the HPT to think about other parliamentarians with links to murder, conspiracy and scandal. Today’s blog from our Lords 1715-1790 project Editor, Dr Robin Eagles considers duels between MPs and their political connections… Politics could … Continue reading “More the air of an assassin than of a gentleman”: Duels & attempted murder in eighteenth-century England