‘Peace for our time’: opposing the Munich Agreement

Tomorrow is the 80th anniversary of the Munich Agreement, the now infamous meeting where Britain and France agreed to hand over part of Czechoslovakia to Nazi Germany in order to avoid war. Yet despite the cheering crowds greeting Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain and his ‘piece of paper’ that guaranteed ‘peace for our time’, the deal was not without opposition, as described by our Assistant Director, … Continue reading ‘Peace for our time’: opposing the Munich Agreement

An Artist in the Attic: Women and the House of Commons in the Early-Nineteenth Century

Originally posted on The Victorian Commons:
In this guest post, Amy Galvin-Elliott from the University of Warwick looks at how women were able to witness debates in the House of Commons from the ‘ventilator’, a space used until the fire of October 1834 destroyed the old Palace of Westminster. Amy is undertaking a PhD as part of an ESRC funded project between the University of Warwick… Continue reading An Artist in the Attic: Women and the House of Commons in the Early-Nineteenth Century

Life before Parliament: the formative years of Josiah C. Wedgwood, 1872-1904

Last night at the new Newcastle-under-Lyme Library the History of Parliament’s Sammy Sturgess and Emma Peplow, along with British Academy / Wolfson Foundation Research Professor Paul Seaward, gave a talk about the life of Josiah C. Wedgwood to local history enthusiasts. They were graciously introduced by Zagham Farhan, the Member of Youth Parliament for Newcastle-under-Lyme and Moorlands. This event launched our exhibition tour in North Staffordshire as part … Continue reading Life before Parliament: the formative years of Josiah C. Wedgwood, 1872-1904

Women behind the polls: the electoral patronage of Anne St John, countess of Rochester

Earlier this month the History of Parliament Trust with partners UK Parliament’s Vote 100 project and the Schools of Humanities at the University of Westminster held a conference to mark the centenary of the passing of the 1918 legislation that formally accorded women the right to sit in Parliament. It is in this context, and as a follow-up to her previous blog on female voters … Continue reading Women behind the polls: the electoral patronage of Anne St John, countess of Rochester

‘He chose the forefront of the battle’: Lord Alexander George Thynne (1873-1918)

Here’s the next instalment from Dr Kathryn Rix (Assistant Editor of the House of Commons 1832-1868 project) in her series commemorating those MPs who died during the First World War. You can see the rest of the series here… On 14 September 1918 Lord Alexander Thynne became the final serving Member of Parliament to be killed in action during the First World War. A Conservative, he … Continue reading ‘He chose the forefront of the battle’: Lord Alexander George Thynne (1873-1918)

Medieval MP of the Month: Robert Hill (c.1391-1444) of Shilston, Devon.

Today’s blog is the second installment from our new series ‘Medieval MP of the Month’ – the precursor to the History of Parliament’s forthcoming set of volumes relating to the reign of Henry VI that will be published in 2019. In this post we hear from Senior Research Fellow Dr Hannes Kleineke  about landed gentleman Robert Hill… While clashes over fishing stocks in the Seine estuary … Continue reading Medieval MP of the Month: Robert Hill (c.1391-1444) of Shilston, Devon.

“The Cause of Decency against Indecency”: Lady Chatham and the 1788 Westminster election

The latest post from the Georgian Lords features a guest blog by Dr Jacqueline Reiter, biographer of the 2nd earl of Chatham, on the role of the countess of Chatham in the notorious Westminster by-election held in the summer of 1788. On 12 July 1788, the London Gazette announced the appointment of Vice-Admiral Samuel, Lord Hood, to the Admiralty Board. Members of Parliament who accepted … Continue reading “The Cause of Decency against Indecency”: Lady Chatham and the 1788 Westminster election