Round-table session: Digital humanities and political history: in memoriam Valerie Cromwell

At our first ‘Parliaments, Politics & People’ seminar of the new academic year, Dr Hannes Kleineke, Dr Ruth Ahnert, Professor Arthur Burns, and Professor Jane Winters offered some compelling insights into the evolution of digital humanities, its impact on the practice of history, the importance of interdisciplinary collaboration, and the management of digital projects. Our first session of the Parliaments, Politics and People seminar for … Continue reading Round-table session: Digital humanities and political history: in memoriam Valerie Cromwell

Black History Month: “Pompey, Colonel Hill’s black”, and the politics of footmen in Queen Anne’s London

October is Black History Month in the UK and today we hear from Dr Paul Seaward, our former Director and British Academy/ Wolfson Foundation Research Professor about the politics of footmen and the amateur political ambition of a black servant… In November 1710, the satirist, clergyman and Tory activist Jonathan Swift went to Westminster to see the opening of Parliament following his party’s success in … Continue reading Black History Month: “Pompey, Colonel Hill’s black”, and the politics of footmen in Queen Anne’s London

MPs in World War I: the Hon. Charles Henry Lyell (1875-1918)

Last month we marked the centenary of the last serving MP to be killed in action during the First World War and today we commemorate a former MP who died while on military service. Dr. Kathryn Rix, Assistant Editor of our House of Commons, 1832-1868 project, will conclude her blog series next month with a special post reflecting on all 24 MPs and former MPs … Continue reading MPs in World War I: the Hon. Charles Henry Lyell (1875-1918)

The Kidney Stone of Alderman Adams

Continuing the theme of health, medicine and Parliament, Dr Patrick Little of the House of Commons 1640-1660 section looks at how a notable and multifaceted London MP of the mid-17th century provides a vivid illustration of a danger highlighted in very recent clinical trials… The link between the Ig Nobel Prize for improbable research and the 1640-1660 Section of the History of Parliament Trust is … Continue reading The Kidney Stone of Alderman Adams

‘His Presence contributed greatly to the success of the Day’: George II, king and soldier

Today marks the anniversary of the coronation of George II, the British monarch known for being the last to ride into battle with their troops. He did so at the Battle of Dettingen in 1743. Dr Robin Eagles, Editor of our House of Lords 1715-1790 Section and manager of the Georgian Lords Twitter and blog discusses George’s, initially less illustrious, military career… On Sunday 27 … Continue reading ‘His Presence contributed greatly to the success of the Day’: George II, king and soldier

Medieval MP of the Month: Sir Christopher Talbot

Here’s the next installment in our series ‘Medieval MP of the Month’ – the precursor to the History of Parliament’s forthcoming set of volumes relating to the reign of Henry VI that will be published in 2019. Today we here from Senior Research Fellow, Dr Simon Payling about the suspicious circumstances surrounding the death of Sir Christopher Talbot… Sir Christopher Talbot (1415-43) was a notable MP … Continue reading Medieval MP of the Month: Sir Christopher Talbot

“Dismal” – Daniel Finch, 2nd earl of Nottingham

In this latest post for the Georgian Lords, Dr Stuart Handley, senior research fellow in the House of Lords 1715-90 section, considers the career of one of the more sober members of the House in the late 17th and early 18th centuries. Dismal: adjective (dizmәl): ‘of a character or aspect that causes gloom and depression; depressingly dark, sombre, gloomy, dreary, or cheerless.’ [OED] “Dismal” was … Continue reading “Dismal” – Daniel Finch, 2nd earl of Nottingham