Voting and not voting in Cromwellian Scotland

Today, on St Andrew’s Day we have a Scotland themed blog from Dr Patrick Little of the House of Commons 1640-1660 Section as part of our Patron Saints series. He discusses voting in Cromwellian Scotland… Nowadays the Scots have the reputation for being enthusiastic voters. Recent General Elections have seen more than two-thirds of the electorate casting their ballots (71% in 2015, 67% in 2017) … Continue reading Voting and not voting in Cromwellian Scotland

Medieval MP of the Month: An MP Struck by Lightning

Today we hear from House of Commons 1422-1504 Section Editor, Dr Linda Clark for the next installment in our series ‘Medieval MP of the Month’. This series is a precursor to the History of Parliament’s forthcoming set of volumes relating to the reign of Henry VI that will be published in 2019. Sir James Berners was struck by lightning whilst on a pilgrimage with the King… At just a few … Continue reading Medieval MP of the Month: An MP Struck by Lightning

Robert Lowe and the University of London constituency

Ahead of tonight’s IHR Parliaments, Politics and People seminar we hear from Professor Jon Parry of Cambridge University who spoke at our special Parliaments, Politics and People seminar marking UK Parliament Week (‘One person, multiple votes: university constituencies and the electoral system, 1868-1950’). He discusses the history of the University of London and its first MP, Robert Lowe, who represented the constituency between 1868 and 1880.  150 years ago, at the general … Continue reading Robert Lowe and the University of London constituency

The early Stuart judiciary – independent or subservient?

In the wake of recent events in America, Dr Paul Hunneyball of the Lords 1604-29 section considers the role of the judiciary in early Stuart political controversies… Much of the recent storm surrounding the appointment of Brett Kavanaugh as a judge in the United States Supreme Court was generated by allegations of sexual misconduct in his earlier life. However, the political partisanship which marked the … Continue reading The early Stuart judiciary – independent or subservient?

Revisiting the origins of the Kindertransport on its 80th anniversary

Today is the 80th anniversary of what is now known as the Kindertransport debate in the House of Commons. Ahead of our conference to commemorate the life of the History of Parliament Trust’s founder, and determined campaigner in support of the Jews of Nazi-occupied Europe, Josiah C. Wedgwood, Dr Jennifer Craig-Norton (Honorary Fellow of the Parkes Institute at the University of Southampton) discusses the debate and … Continue reading Revisiting the origins of the Kindertransport on its 80th anniversary

The role and power of the House of Lords

Originally posted on The Victorian Commons:
To mark Parliament Week 2018, our editor Dr Philip Salmon looks at a key element of Parliament which we don’t usually have much opportunity to reflect on in our work on Victorian MPs and constituencies: the House of Lords. Yet, as he explains below, the upper chamber played a vital role in many important 19th century reforms and continued… Continue reading The role and power of the House of Lords

Peace at Last?

Earlier this autumn saw the 80th anniversary of the Munich agreement, marked by a ‘Peace for our Time’ blog from our assistant director, Dr Emma Peplow.  As the first of a series from the House of Commons 1640-1660 section looking at events over the winter of 1648-1649, Dr Vivienne Larminie examines another occasion on which lasting peace seemed within the grasp of politicians at Westminster.  … Continue reading Peace at Last?