Top tips for Christmas at the Jacobean court

As History of Parliament staff prepare for their Christmas break, Dr Paul Hunneyball of the Lords 1604-29 section ponders the pleasures and pitfalls that might have awaited a Jacobean courtier 400 years ago… Tip 1: No partying on Christmas Day In the early 17th century, unlike today, 25 December was primarily a time for solemn religious observance. The entire royal household was expected to attend … Continue reading Top tips for Christmas at the Jacobean court

Medieval MP of the Month: Santa Claus in Parliament

Here’s a seasonal offering from Hannes Kleineke of the House of Commons 1422-1504 Section for our Medieval MP of Month… While much has rightly been made this year of the career and legacy of Col. Josiah Wedgwood, MP, the founder of the History of Parliament, his pioneering biographical volumes were not without their quirks, and, at times, a degree of involuntary humour. A seasonal example … Continue reading Medieval MP of the Month: Santa Claus in Parliament

Reflections on the Vote 100 project and the Lady Astor Statue project #Astor100

The final installment for the Women and Parliament blog series in 2018 is rather appropriately written by Linda Gilroy, former MP for Plymouth Sutton (1997-2010). Linda tells us about an exciting project to raise a statue of the first woman to take her seat in Parliament, Lady Nancy Astor, which is part of the #Astor100 project that will be taking place throughout 2019… Celebrating the … Continue reading Reflections on the Vote 100 project and the Lady Astor Statue project #Astor100

No deal: Pride’s Purge and retreat from settlement

As MPs prepare to vote over whether or not to accept the Brexit deal negotiated by Theresa May, we have the second post in the series on the tumultuous events of 1648-1649, as parliamentarians disputed with each other over a treaty which might end the civil wars.  Dr Vivienne Larminie of the House of Commons 1640-1660 section moves on from 15 November to 6 December … Continue reading No deal: Pride’s Purge and retreat from settlement

‘Persons of Rank and Distinction’: negotiating the Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle (1748)

Last month @GeorgianLords joined with @HistParl to discuss a series of treaties from the 17th to the mid-18th centuries. In this follow-up blog post, Dr Robin Eagles, Editor of the Lords 1715-90 section, considers in more depth the Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle, which brought to a close the War of the Austrian Succession. In the winter of 1748 two British peers presented themselves to the French … Continue reading ‘Persons of Rank and Distinction’: negotiating the Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle (1748)

Standing orders and precedents in the Irish House of Commons in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries

Today’s blog from Glenn McKee follows his paper given at our Parliaments, Politics and People Seminar at the IHR last week. Below Glenn summarizes his paper ‘Standing orders and precedents in the Irish House of Commons in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries’… The paper examined how the Irish House of Commons used precedents and standing orders in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. In the seventeenth … Continue reading Standing orders and precedents in the Irish House of Commons in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries