The Six Acts and Censorship of the Press

Today we round off our Peterloo blog series with Dr Katie Carpenter’s second post about the legislation that was rushed through Parliament following the Peterloo Massacre on 16 August 1819. Today she discusses its aim of censoring the press… After the Peterloo Massacre, Lord Liverpool’s government quickly passed six pieces of oppressive legislation in late 1819. These new laws, which became known as the Six … Continue reading The Six Acts and Censorship of the Press

Protest Against the Six Acts

On this day in 1819 the massacre that was soon dubbed ‘Peterloo’ by the press occurred on St Peter’s Field in Manchester. The Manchester and Salford Yeomanry and the 15th Hussars, a British Army cavalry regiment, killed at least 18 people and injured a further 600+ after being called to disperse a crowd of over 60,000 people who were meeting on the site to peacefully protest … Continue reading Protest Against the Six Acts

After Peterloo: From Repression to Reform

As we prepare to commemorate the bicentenary of Peterloo Massacre this Friday – 16 August – we hear from editor of our 1832-68 project for the second time in our Peterloo blog series. Dr Philip Salmon discusses the aftermath of the Massacre, and the public protest and parliamentary reform that followed in the nineteenth century… Public opinion was shocked by the murder of so many … Continue reading After Peterloo: From Repression to Reform

Manchester and the Lancashire peerage: the background to Peterloo

In the latest blog from the Georgian Lords, Dr Charles Littleton considers the influence of some of the local grandees in parts of Lancashire, their potential impact on the drive for reform in the early 19th century and how they may have helped contribute to Peterloo This month the country will be marking the bicentenary of the ‘Peterloo Massacre’. On 16 August 1819 a crowd … Continue reading Manchester and the Lancashire peerage: the background to Peterloo

The Inquest into the death of John Lees

Our blog series to mark the bicentenary of the Peterloo Massacre continues today with Dr Katie Carpenter‘s third piece, which considers the inquest into the death of a young man following the infamous event at St. Peter’s Field in August 1819. Katie’s previous pieces and others in this series can be found here. There was never an official parliamentary inquiry into the Peterloo Massacre, that dark day on 16 August 1819 when … Continue reading The Inquest into the death of John Lees

The Man in the Moon: Peterloo and Satire continued

Our blog series to mark the bicentenary of the Peterloo Massacre continues today with Dr Katie Carpenter‘s second piece about the satirical depiction of the tragedy. Today she discusses The Man in the Moon by William Hone. If you missed the rest of the series and would like a some context to this blog click here to see previous posts. I lately dream’d that, in … Continue reading The Man in the Moon: Peterloo and Satire continued

Remembering Peterloo: protest, satire and reform

On 11 July 2019 the History of Parliament Trust, the Parliamentary Archives and the Citizens Project hosted Professor Robert Poole, Professor Ian Haywood and Dr Katrina Navickas at an event in the Palace of Westminster. This panel of three leading scholars offered intriguing new insights into the latest research on the Peterloo Massacre. The event accompanied the launch of the ‘Parliament & Peterloo’ exhibition, which … Continue reading Remembering Peterloo: protest, satire and reform