‘The King’ and I

Dr Hannes Kleineke, editor of the 1461-1504 section, reflects on the experience of acting as a historical adviser for the new Netflix movie ‘The King’. What makes good television? Certainly not the often humdrum details of historical reality with which the professional historian has to concern him or herself. It is thus an interesting experience to be invited to provide historical insights to the producers … Continue reading ‘The King’ and I

A Speaker-Elect Makes a Quick Escape from the Parliamentary Turmoil caused by England’s Precipitous Exit from Europe

In light of the recent controversy surrounding the current Speaker of the House of Commons and his position on Brexit, Dr Linda Clark, Editor of the House of Commons 1422-1504 Section discusses how Agincourt veteran, Sir John Popham narrowly escaped assuming the daunting task of Speaker nearing the turbulent end of the Hundred Years’ War… A chronicler laconically remarked of 1449 that ‘This yere the … Continue reading A Speaker-Elect Makes a Quick Escape from the Parliamentary Turmoil caused by England’s Precipitous Exit from Europe

MPs as law enforcers in Late Medieval England

In today’s guest blog, from Dr Gordon McKelvie from the University of Winchester discusses whether the MPs who passed legislation in medieval England were actually that keen on enforcing them… A common debate about criminality is the reliability of criminal statistics – i.e. do changes in such statistics reveal actual changes in levels of crime or simply changes in the recording of crimes. Most historians … Continue reading MPs as law enforcers in Late Medieval England

European diplomacy: the ‘double monarchy’ of England and France envisaged in the treaty of Troyes of 1420

Today, the new Prime Minister Theresa May makes her first diplomatic trip to meet her counterparts in Germany and France.  Here Dr Simon Payling, Senior Fellow of the Commons 1422-1504 section, blogs about parliament’s reaction to another major realignment in European relations, although in very different circumstances, Henry V’s attempt to unify the crowns of England and France in 1420… On 21 May 1420 Henry … Continue reading European diplomacy: the ‘double monarchy’ of England and France envisaged in the treaty of Troyes of 1420

After Agincourt: the life of Sir John Pennington

This past week we have been celebrating the 600th anniversary of the Battle of Agincourt (including the History of Parliament’s ‘A Band of Brothers’ booklet on Parliament and the battle).  Dr Simon Payling, Senior Fellow of the Commons 1422-1504 section, explores what happened next for one Agincourt veteran during uncertain political times… Sir John Pennington (c.1393-1470) of Muncaster in Cumberland, from one of the richest … Continue reading After Agincourt: the life of Sir John Pennington

Medieval migration

As Europe’s migration crisis continues, Dr Hannes Kleineke, Senior Research Fellow on the Commons 1422-1504 section, explores the medieval House of Commons’ approach to immigration… If the 18th century was concerned with the question of ‘mass migration’ from the Palatinate, the House of Commons had a longer tradition of considering questions of immigration. In the later middle ages, petitions for royal letters of denization came … Continue reading Medieval migration

The ‘Election’ of the Speaker in Fifteenth-Century Parliaments

Today Parliament returns, and the new assembly’s first job is to elect a new Speaker. Dr Simon Payling, Senior Fellow of the Commons 1422-1504 section, explores how medieval parliaments ‘chose’ their Speakers… The practice of electing the Speaker can be traced back almost to the origins of the office in the 1370s, but there is almost nothing to show the form taken by these elections … Continue reading The ‘Election’ of the Speaker in Fifteenth-Century Parliaments

Agincourt, Dick Whittington and trials with Latin: a summer placement at the History of Parliament

From time to time student volunteers join sections of the History for short placements. This summer, the 1422-1504 section played host to David Whitehorn, a second-year history undergraduate from Royal Holloway, University of London. David writes of his experience: I have to admit I didn’t really know anything about the History of Parliament before I applied for the placement, but over my time here I … Continue reading Agincourt, Dick Whittington and trials with Latin: a summer placement at the History of Parliament