Towards a sonic history of Chartism: Music, sound and politics in mid-nineteenth-century Britain

Ahead of tonight’s Parliaments, Politics and People seminar at the Institute of Historical Research, we hear from Dr David Kennerley, a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow at Queen Mary, University of London. He spoke at our previous session on 19 February about his research into the sound of Chartism… For many decades, historians haven’t really thought about sound. It’s easy to see why, since unlike text, visual images … Continue reading Towards a sonic history of Chartism: Music, sound and politics in mid-nineteenth-century Britain

The 1842 Chartist Petition – why over 3 million signatures translated into less than 50 votes

Today’s blog about the Chartist Petition of 1842 is part of our focus on wider electoral and political reform throughout this significant anniversary year in women’s political history – for more blogs in the series see here. The following blog has been written by year 10 work experience student, Layla Barwell from Dartford Grammar School for Girls. Layla spent the week with the public engagement … Continue reading The 1842 Chartist Petition – why over 3 million signatures translated into less than 50 votes

Event review: Parliament and Popular Sovereignty in the nineteenth century, 22 March 2018.

Today’s blog is a summary of our afternoon event about Parliament and Popular Sovereignty in the nineteenth century, which was held before Easter at the Palace of Westminster … On  22 March 2018 the History of Parliament hosted an event in the Jubilee Room at the Palace of Westminster entitled, ‘Parliament and Popular Sovereignty in the nineteenth century’. The event was another chance to hear … Continue reading Event review: Parliament and Popular Sovereignty in the nineteenth century, 22 March 2018.

Why political history still matters

Dr Katrina Navickas from the University of Hertfordshire was the keynote speaker at the History of Parliament Trust and Durham University’s Parliaments and Popular Sovereignty conference, which was held at the People’s History Museum in Manchester in November 2017. She offers a blog on the importance of political history today… There is lively public interest in the origins of popular representation in the British political … Continue reading Why political history still matters

The long-lived charter: Magna Carta’s 800 year legacy

800 years ago today, Magna Carta was sealed at Runnymede. In the last of our series celebrating the anniversaries of Magna Carta and Simon de Montfort’s Parliament, Dr Alexander Lock, Curator of Modern Historical Manuscripts at the British Library and lead researcher for the Library’s acclaimed Magna Carta exhibition, discusses how Magna Carta came to become an important symbol of the parliamentary system… Though Magna … Continue reading The long-lived charter: Magna Carta’s 800 year legacy

Parliaments, Politics and People seminar: Henry Miller, ‘Popular politics before democracy: the culture of petitioning in Manchester, c. 1780-1914’

Dr Henry Miller, formerly of the History of Parliament Trust, but now at the University of Manchester, reports back from his recent seminar paper discussing the enormous popularity of petitioning in the ‘long 19th century’ (c. 1780-1914)… The second ‘Parliaments, politics and people’ seminar of the summer term took place on the 26 May. The premise of my paper was that many accounts of modern British … Continue reading Parliaments, Politics and People seminar: Henry Miller, ‘Popular politics before democracy: the culture of petitioning in Manchester, c. 1780-1914’