Samuel Peploe: scourge of the Jacobites?

In the latest blog for the Georgian Lords, Dr Stuart Handley, examines the career of the fierce anti-Jacobite clergyman, Samuel Peploe, whose tub-thumping sermons against the rebels in 1715 helped gain him promotion in the early Georgian church. Samuel Peploe was baptized in 1667, and after attending Oxford University, he was ordained a priest in 1692. In 1700 he was named as vicar of Preston … Continue reading Samuel Peploe: scourge of the Jacobites?

“Dismal” – Daniel Finch, 2nd earl of Nottingham

In this latest post for the Georgian Lords, Dr Stuart Handley, senior research fellow in the House of Lords 1715-90 section, considers the career of one of the more sober members of the House in the late 17th and early 18th centuries. Dismal: adjective (dizmәl): ‘of a character or aspect that causes gloom and depression; depressingly dark, sombre, gloomy, dreary, or cheerless.’ [OED] “Dismal” was … Continue reading “Dismal” – Daniel Finch, 2nd earl of Nottingham

When is a degree, not a degree?

In the latest blog for the Georgian Lords, Dr Stuart Handley, senior research fellow for the Lords 1715-90 section, considers the topical issue of university degrees and the need for appropriate qualifications in the early eighteenth century. University degrees are the preoccupation of many students at this time of year. They are a passport to employment. It was ever thus, with the tenure of certain … Continue reading When is a degree, not a degree?

Parliaments, Politics & People seminar: Miles Taylor, ‘Ritualism from below: St Stephen’s crypt, Westminster and its uses, c.1865-1955’

Our ‘Parliaments, politics and people’ seminar returned last week for a new academic year! Here’s our first report of the term… Professor Miles Taylor spoke about his work with the ‘Virtual St Stephens’ project, which explores the history of St Stephens Hall, Westminster. The subject of Professor Taylor’s paper was the crypt, now known as St Mary Undercroft, and its transformation after the fire of … Continue reading Parliaments, Politics & People seminar: Miles Taylor, ‘Ritualism from below: St Stephen’s crypt, Westminster and its uses, c.1865-1955’