‘The dearest friend I ever had’: Richard Lumley, 2nd earl of Scarbrough

This week (10-16 May 2021) marks Mental Health Awareness Week in the UK. Mental illness is often hidden or misidentified in the historical record, and at the History of Parliament we’re trying to do our bit to correct this. Our research staff often identify cases of parliamentarians who suffered with their mental health, and today, Dr Robin Eagles, editor of our Lords 1715-1790 project, considers … Continue reading ‘The dearest friend I ever had’: Richard Lumley, 2nd earl of Scarbrough

Portraits, Plates and Pigs: Representations of National Leaders within the Material Culture of Scottish Radical Procession 1832-1884

Ahead of next Tuesday’s Virtual IHR Parliaments, Politics and People seminar, we hear from Sonny Angus, of the University of Edinburgh. On 18 May 2021, between 5.15 p.m. and 6.30 p.m., Sonny will be responding to your questions about his pre-circulated paper on the material culture of Scottish radical politics, 1832-1884. Details of how to join the discussion are available here, or by contacting seminar@histparl.ac.uk. … Continue reading Portraits, Plates and Pigs: Representations of National Leaders within the Material Culture of Scottish Radical Procession 1832-1884

‘London’s Latest Ordeal’: the Blitz and rebuilding of the House of Commons Chamber

On the evening of the 10/11 May 1941 the House of Commons Chamber was destroyed during the Blitz. In today’s blog, 80 years on, our Public Engagement Assistant Connie Jeffery explores the event and how Parliament rebuilt and recovered from the destruction… Like much of the United Kingdom’s home front, Westminster was no stranger to the effects of the Second World War. Parliament’s recognisable home … Continue reading ‘London’s Latest Ordeal’: the Blitz and rebuilding of the House of Commons Chamber

The hunting down of Queen Margaret: the battle of Tewkesbury 4 May 1471

Today we mark the anniversary of another key battle within the Wars of the Roses: the battle of Tewkesbury. As Edward IV’s forces sought to build on their earlier victory at the battle of Barnet, attention turned to Margaret of Anjou, as Dr Simon Payling from our Commons 1461-1504 project explains… The most striking facet of the campaign that saw Edward IV win victories at … Continue reading The hunting down of Queen Margaret: the battle of Tewkesbury 4 May 1471

‘Seldom… disturbed by the bustle of trade or the affairs of Government’: Lymington from Restoration to Reform

As we gear up for May’s Local and Community History Month, today Dr Robin Eagles, editor of our Lords 1715-1790 project, begins our look at port constituencies. Hubs of trade and industry, historically ports have been central to both national economy and military defence, making their representation in Parliament very important. Here Dr Eagles casts an eye on the town of Lymington on the south … Continue reading ‘Seldom… disturbed by the bustle of trade or the affairs of Government’: Lymington from Restoration to Reform

1951 and the Birth of the History of Parliament

This week the History of Parliament celebrates the 70th anniversary of one of many important dates in its history. To mark the occasion our director Dr Paul Seaward looks back to the beginnings of our project as we know it today. The History of Parliament has lots of birthdays, for its genesis as a project was a complicated and long-drawn out process. But one of … Continue reading 1951 and the Birth of the History of Parliament

History of Parliament Trust Annual Lecture 2020: ‘Parliament in a national crisis’ given by Chris Bryant MP

On 25 November 2020 Chris Bryant, MP for Rhondda and Trustee for the History of Parliament, delivered 2020’s annual lecture ‘Parliament in a national crisis’ via Zoom. If you weren’t able to make it, below you will find a PDF of the full lecture. Chris’s bio Chris is a Welsh Labour Party politician who has served as Member of Parliament for the Rhondda since 2001. … Continue reading History of Parliament Trust Annual Lecture 2020: ‘Parliament in a national crisis’ given by Chris Bryant MP

Review of the Year 2020

2020 was a year like no other, a statement to which we can all attest. The Covid-19 pandemic created many new challenges from an operational perspective at the History of Parliament Trust. Despite this, we managed to publish research, offer events, run competitions for students, and more. Here’s Sammy Sturgess with a round-up of 2020 at the HPT… In April 2020 we published the long-awaited … Continue reading Review of the Year 2020

‘The King’ and I

Dr Hannes Kleineke, editor of the 1461-1504 section, reflects on the experience of acting as a historical adviser for the new Netflix movie ‘The King’. What makes good television? Certainly not the often humdrum details of historical reality with which the professional historian has to concern him or herself. It is thus an interesting experience to be invited to provide historical insights to the producers … Continue reading ‘The King’ and I

A life in parliamentary history: Linda Clark

Today, editor of our newest project, the Commons 1461-1504, Dr. Hannes Kleineke pays to tribute to the recently retired editor of the Commons 1422-1461 volumes, and long-serving History of Parliament colleague, Dr. Linda Clark. At close of play on 30 September 2019 Linda Clark formally retired from the full-time staff of the History of Parliament after a full fifty years of distinguished service. Linda first … Continue reading A life in parliamentary history: Linda Clark