Execution of Charles I – ‘King-killer’: the Making of a Regicide

In the fourth in our series on the tumultuous events of the winter of 1648-9, and following on from the trial of Charles I, we turn now to the consequence of a guilty verdict.  Dr Patrick Little of the House of Commons 1640-1660 considers the process whereby one MP became a signatory to the death warrant for Charles I, executed at Whitehall on this day … Continue reading Execution of Charles I – ‘King-killer’: the Making of a Regicide

Gout and the political career of Lord Broghill

Today’s blog from Dr Patrick Little of the Commons 1640-1660 Section sees the return of our focus on health, medicine and Parliament. Patrick discusses the detrimental effect of gout on the career of Lord Broghill in the mid-seventeenth century… Roger Boyle, Lord Broghill, is perhaps best known as the leading supporter of the scheme to make Oliver Cromwell king under the revised constitution, the Humble … Continue reading Gout and the political career of Lord Broghill

The importance of royal pardons in Restoration England.

The UK is celebrating the centenary of the passing of the Representation of the People Act 1918, which allowed some women to vote for the first time. This has enlivened a debate relating to the posthumous pardon of Suffragettes convicted of offences during the campaign for ‘Votes for Women’. The History of Parliament’s Director and editor of the Commons 1640-1660 section, Dr Stephen Roberts explains … Continue reading The importance of royal pardons in Restoration England.

The Dismissal of Clarendon

350 years ago this month, the Lord Chancellor, Edward Hyde, earl of Clarendon, was dismissed following the disaster on the Medway. Our Director, Dr Paul Seaward, tells us more… On the evening of 30th August 1667 one of the two secretaries of state, Sir William Morrice, was sent by the King to the lord chancellor, Edward Hyde, earl of Clarendon in his grand, newly-completed palace … Continue reading The Dismissal of Clarendon

Parliaments, politics and people seminar: Paul Seaward, Mr Marvell goes to Westminster: the poet as parliament-man

At our latest ‘Parliaments, Politics and People’ Seminar, our Director, Dr Paul Seaward, spoke on ‘Mr Marvell goes to Westminster: the poet as parliament-man.’ Here he gives an overview of his paper… If poets are the unacknowledged legislators of mankind, it comes as a surprise how many acknowledged poets have been proper legislators. In the seventeenth century, John Donne, Edmund Waller, Sir John Denham and … Continue reading Parliaments, politics and people seminar: Paul Seaward, Mr Marvell goes to Westminster: the poet as parliament-man

Parliaments, Politics and People seminar: Sarah Ward, ‘I am nothing discuraged to present you with the Parliament newse’: parliamentary news, personal interest and political action in north-east Wales, 1640-88

Our final ‘Parliaments, Politics and People’ seminar of the year took place last week, as Sarah Ward of Oxford University, gave a paper on ‘I am nothing discuraged to present you with the Parliament newse’: parliamentary news, personal interest and political action in north-east Wales, 1640-88. Here Sarah reports back on her paper… This paper delivered the preliminary findings of an examination of the news … Continue reading Parliaments, Politics and People seminar: Sarah Ward, ‘I am nothing discuraged to present you with the Parliament newse’: parliamentary news, personal interest and political action in north-east Wales, 1640-88