From ‘my charming angel’ to ‘a fool and tool of a party’: The love letters of Mrs Sarah Sidney to Baron Ossulston

In this latest blog post for the Georgian Lords, Dr Charles Littleton, senior research fellow on the Lords 1715-1790 section, considers a surprise find among the personal papers of a Whig peer in the early years of the eighteenth century. Historical gems can turn up in unexpected places and in initially unpromising sources. Charles Bennet, 2nd Baron Ossulston, is a case in point. In the … Continue reading From ‘my charming angel’ to ‘a fool and tool of a party’: The love letters of Mrs Sarah Sidney to Baron Ossulston

“The Greatest Appearance of Company ever seen”: Parliament, politics and horse-racing in the early 18th century

With Parliament in recess and ‘Glorious Goodwood’ in full swing, Dr Robin Eagles, Editor of the House of Lords 1715-90 section, considers the importance of racing in Georgian society as an opportunity for political display… In the late summer of 1724 Lord Bingley laid on an entertainment at his estate at Bramham Moor, offering prizes amounting to 12 guineas for those taking part in a … Continue reading “The Greatest Appearance of Company ever seen”: Parliament, politics and horse-racing in the early 18th century

The soldiers’ ‘real friend’: John, Earl Ligonier: Huguenot refugee and British commander-in-chief

In this latest blog for the Georgian Lords, Dr Charles Littleton, senior research fellow in the Lords 1715-90 section, examines the career and lasting influence of one of the pre-eminent British generals of the middle years of the 18th century. Ligonier may seem, initially, a strange subject for a site devoted to the 18th-century peerage. He was a British peer for only the last seven … Continue reading The soldiers’ ‘real friend’: John, Earl Ligonier: Huguenot refugee and British commander-in-chief

What Shall we do with the Children?

In the latest post for the Georgian Lords, Dr Stuart Handley considers the difficulties one peerage family experienced in providing for a large family, the strategies pursued and the resulting careers of the offspring of the first Baron Barnard. Eighteenth-century correspondence often focused on the provisions to be made for the children of a marriage. Good planning could avoid the unpredictable nature of the time. … Continue reading What Shall we do with the Children?

“Void of all faith and honour?” The fall(s) and rise of Viscount Bolingbroke

In this latest blog post from the Georgian Lords, Dr Robin Eagles considers the instability of the early years of George I’s reign and the changing fortunes of former secretary of state, Henry St John, Viscount Bolingbroke The Hanoverian succession may have passed off peacefully in 1714, but within a year of George I ascending the throne the new regime was faced with rioting in … Continue reading “Void of all faith and honour?” The fall(s) and rise of Viscount Bolingbroke

‘Of the utmost weight for the safety and tranquillity of the kingdom’: the snap election of 1747

The latest in our General Election 2017 series and launching our new blog series on The Georgian Lords, Dr Robin Eagles, Senior Research Fellow of the Lords 1715-90 Section, describes the Pelham ministry’s snap decision to call an election and catch the opposition off-balance… On 17 June 1747 George II attended the House of Lords to grant his assent to some 59 new pieces of … Continue reading ‘Of the utmost weight for the safety and tranquillity of the kingdom’: the snap election of 1747